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View Full Version : Stricker's Swing WILL Catch On.



Johneli
09-10-2009, 11:50 AM
It's a well-known fact that the fewer moving parts you have (in anything) the less that can go wrong. Enter Steve Stricker. No apparent wrist break eliminates one of the most crucial elements in the golf swing......timing. Without the wrist break he doesn't have to worry about it. Ever wonder why he's soooo good from 125 and in....that's the reason.

Now, before anyone start in about distance, he hits it far. Even outdrove Tiger a couple times on par 5's. So that's not a concern.

Do you think Stricker's on to something with that swing? Some others come close but all of them break their wrists more. (Zack, Lucas.)

I think it's a great swing to emulate.

BigLeftyinAZ
09-10-2009, 11:56 AM
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provisional
09-10-2009, 12:32 PM
I'll have to watch this thread..............

pjcedog
09-10-2009, 02:54 PM
Emulate his hand action, or seeming lack of it, that is how he controls his shots so well. Everything is very square all the way back and through, no big issues with timing or with one hand overtaking the other or any of that. It is almost like a full swing chip shot.

baffler231
09-10-2009, 03:04 PM
Everything has timing. You can not eliminate timing. His swing is great for very few people that play golf. Most people(like 99.9%) could not use the club this way.

pjcedog
09-10-2009, 03:49 PM
Everything has timing. You can not eliminate timing. His swing is great for very few people that play golf. Most people(like 99.9%) could not use the club this way.

Sorry to disagree with you but his swing is specifically designed to eliminate issues with hand action through the ball which is all about timing, not tempo or rythm, but timing. He is keeping his wrists and hands very rigid going back and then going through the ball and keeping the club face very square. Hard? Not so hard really - you can swing that way with a little practice and I used to do something very similar to that but I don't get as much distance as I do from a more traditional swing. In fact keeping the clubface very square to the target all the way back and through like that is a better way for beginners to swing than trying to go with a more handsy style.

Esox
09-10-2009, 08:54 PM
My twelve year old daughter has a coach that is trying to teach her to swing this way. She can do it pretty well when he's standing there. When I've got her on the range myself, not so much. He knows Stricker's coach and FIL, Dennis Tiziani well. They've both been teaching in Cheeseland for many years.

The "dead" hand wedges Stricker hits are absolute things of beauty.

Kevin

Craig Mac
09-10-2009, 08:59 PM
I've always had the impression that his swings "misses" ended up in pulls/hooks, am I correct in that?? The last thing I need is more of those.

blue_ridge
09-10-2009, 10:37 PM
Enter Steve Stricker. No apparent wrist break eliminates one of the most crucial elements in the golf swing......timing. Without the wrist break he doesn't have to worry about it.

I like Stricker's swing too and agree that there are things about it that seem worth studying and attempting. But either I am misunderstanding the statement "no apparent wrist break" or you are seeing a different swing than me. He has plenty of wrist break. He swings on a flatter plane and he uses less wrist hinge than many tour players, but just look at your video at 0:15-17 seconds and tell me how you are seeing no "wrist break". My apologies if I have misunderstood your meaning.

pjcedog
09-11-2009, 02:27 AM
I've always had the impression that his swings "misses" ended up in pulls/hooks, am I correct in that?? The last thing I need is more of those.
That was his old swing, not this current one.

GolfProgress
09-11-2009, 02:37 AM
That was his old swing, not this current one.

He did pull hook one into the water a few months ago on a Sunday to lose a tournament.

That being said I think his move is highly repeatable, but the man has an incredibly strong lower body which gives him great stability. Whether average people could swing that way, I have no idea. But better to try to copy his swing than that of Tiger, Sergio, or Philly Mick.

pjcedog
09-11-2009, 02:52 AM
I like Stricker's swing too and agree that there are things about it that seem worth studying and attempting. But either I am misunderstanding the statement "no apparent wrist break" or you are seeing a different swing than me. He has plenty of wrist break. He swings on a flatter plane and he uses less wrist hinge than many tour players, but just look at your video at 0:15-17 seconds and tell me how you are seeing no "wrist break". My apologies if I have misunderstood your meaning.

First of all just look at his swing with irons, not the driver. Compare Freddy Couples', Phil Mickelson's or John Daly's hand action with an iron to Stricker with the same club and you will see the difference between lots of hand and wrist action and what Stricker is doing. Look at Paul Goydos or at Rocco for something very similar to Stricker. He keeps the club face aiming at the target as much as possible all the way back and through. Stricker does swing his driver with a little bit more wrist action that is correct, because he would not be hitting it 290 if he stayed too stiff wristed with it.

baffler231
09-11-2009, 03:23 AM
He keeps the club face aiming at the target as much as possible all the way back and through
That's not what Im seeing I see the face beginning to open at the :10 mark. But I get your point He has less forearm manipulation and a much slower rate of opening(backswing) and closure(downswing & follow thru).

Sorry to disagree with you but his swing is specifically designed to eliminate issues with hand action through the ball which is all about timing, not tempo or rythm, but timing. He is keeping his wrists and hands very rigid going back and then going through the ball and keeping the club face very square
Sorry to disagree again but having a collision with anything has timing, for that matter walking across the putting green has timing. But I understand your point. His swing has much slower rates than your average guy therefore it looks more solid and less flashy,flippy or however you wish to describe a more wristy, handsy swing. My point is he is trying to hit something and there is %100 for sure timing involved. His clubface is %100for sure opening and closing albeit at a very consistent rate which gives him better timing than alot of guys out there but he's still timing it. I also disagree with you on keeping the clubface square to square for beginners is the easiest way. That's the #1 fault they have and why they often chunk or top and slice or pull. The club is meant to open and close and thats scientific fact-not opinion. The rate and technique of closure is every players problem, from tour player to beginner. High handicappers usually dont close at all, or close so early they have to slide the face through impact and great players usually fight rapid closure from under the plane.
Like I said earlier very good players with certain body types and swing patterns could benefit from this type of move but most people would get worse or see little improvement.

pjcedog
09-11-2009, 04:54 AM
That's not what Im seeing I see the face beginning to open at the :10 mark. But I get your point He has less forearm manipulation and a much slower rate of opening(backswing) and closure(downswing & follow thru).

Sorry to disagree again but having a collision with anything has timing, for that matter walking across the putting green has timing. But I understand your point. His swing has much slower rates than your average guy therefore it looks more solid and less flashy,flippy or however you wish to describe a more wristy, handsy swing. My point is he is trying to hit something and there is %100 for sure timing involved. His clubface is %100for sure opening and closing albeit at a very consistent rate which gives him better timing than alot of guys out there but he's still timing it. I also disagree with you on keeping the clubface square to square for beginners is the easiest way. That's the #1 fault they have and why they often chunk or top and slice or pull. The club is meant to open and close and thats scientific fact-not opinion. The rate and technique of closure is every players problem, from tour player to beginner. High handicappers usually dont close at all, or close so early they have to slide the face through impact and great players usually fight rapid closure from under the plane.
Like I said earlier very good players with certain body types and swing patterns could benefit from this type of move but most people would get worse or see little improvement.

I can see that you are not understanding me, maybe I will just say good luck and have fun playing golf.

pjcedog
09-11-2009, 04:57 AM
He did pull hook one into the water a few months ago on a Sunday to lose a tournament.

That being said I think his move is highly repeatable, but the man has an incredibly strong lower body which gives him great stability. Whether average people could swing that way, I have no idea. But better to try to copy his swing than that of Tiger, Sergio, or Philly Mick.

Reverting to old habits under pressure is very common, it happens to everyone.

baffler231
09-11-2009, 05:12 AM
Care to explain where Im not understanding you?? I think Im understanding you not understanding.

Johneli
09-11-2009, 10:30 AM
To clarify before this gets out of hand. I SHOULD have said MINIMAL wrist break.....I could have even said "less wrist break than any other player on tour."

v3.0
09-11-2009, 01:58 PM
I do not like the look of Stricker's swing, and I don't think it would be good for me, but I cannot argue with the results! He is number 2 in the world rankings now: So he is on to something allright!

GolfProgress
09-11-2009, 02:42 PM
Stricker has one of the purest putting strokes on tour, especially on ten footers. The only putters I like better are T. Woods and Badds.